5 Things Seniors Should Know About Cannabis

Hope Marian
3 min readJan 3, 2021

There are many individuals 65+ using cannabis for the first time. Others are revisiting it since earlier times. An increasing number of states have legalized medical marijuana programs and adult use of marijuana. This has created an awareness that changes the stigma around cannabis as it has been known. Education about the benefits and usage of the plant is becoming more available. Also, growing your own is therapeutic in its way and makes a great hobby!

5 Things Seniors Should Know About Cannabis

  1. There are many ways to consume cannabis, so you don’t have to smoke it!
    People often think that they need to smoke the plant, but vaporizing is another very effective option. One can use a flower vape or a pre-filled oil cartridge. When using cartridges, remember to get one free of PEG (polyethylene glycol) and PG (propylene glycol). Healthier options to get the benefits of cannabis include edibles, patches, topicals, and more. In legal or medical states, products are found in different dosages and varieties. Edibles have different effects than other methods, and they can take up to two hours for full absorption. Remember always to start low and go slow. There are many resources available to learn about responsible dosing.
  2. CBD is an option for those who don’t want to get high.
    Cannabidiol is the non-psychoactive cannabinoid, also being used as an introduction to cannabinoid therapy. Patients are finding a decrease in anxiety, inflammation, and general pain. It is being used for MS, PTSD, epilepsy, and other conditions. It’s an option for those with limited access in their state. When purchasing a CBD product, take caution in where it was grown. Aim for buying something in the United States, ideally tested at a third-party lab.
  3. Cannabis treats general pain and opioid addiction.
    There is a great need for research to explore the ways we can use the plant effectively. One study showed after six months of treatment, 93.7% of the respondents reported improvement in their condition. The reported pain level was reduced, from a median of 8 on a scale of 0–10 to a median of 4. After six months, 18.1% stopped using opioid analgesics or reduced their dose 1 This is the beginning of research results showing what cannabis has to offer for addiction treatment.
  4. Microdosing and ratios are also important to understand.
    Individuals are now learning that it is unnecessary to consume or use a large amount of THC in one sitting. Using small doses provides benefits to the user, often without experiencing a heavy “head high.” I use micro-dosing to treat my daily symptoms by taking one or two pulls from a vaporizer or ingesting 5 mg in edibles. Looking at strains and products on the market can be very overwhelming. Ratios can be labeled “CBD: THC.” Strains can be high-THC, low-CBD, high-CBD low-THC, or equal parts.
  5. It can help you sleep.
    There has been a correlation found between cannabis use and the improvement of sleep.2 When seeking a nighttime strain, indica is known to be a beneficial sleep aid. Terpenes provide smell and flavor but also have important therapeutic compounds. Using strains high in the terpene, Myrcene will also have sedative effects. 3

Hope Marian, M.B.A is a cannabis business specialist, educator, and the founder of MigraineHope. She can be reached at info@hopemarian.com.

Work Cited

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29398248
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28349316
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12587690

Originally published in 1000 Watts Magazine

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Hope Marian

Hope Marian is a cannabis business owner, psychedelic educator, and founder of MigraineHope.